Doing service projects together is one way that Scouts keep their promise "to help other people." While a Scout should do his best to help other people every day, a group service project is a bigger way to help people. While you're giving service, you're learning to work together with others to do something that's good for your community.


Below are a list requirements for units and Scouts that are fulfilled by doing service projects.


UNITS:


  • Pack Journey to Excellence Requirement 7.   Service projects:  The pack participates in service projects, with one benefitting your chartering organization.  The projects are entered on the Journey to Excellence website.  Complete two for bronze, three for silver, four for gold. 
  • Troop Journey to Excellence Requirement 8.   Service projects:  The troop participates in service projects, with one benefitting your chartering organization.  The projects are entered on the Journey to Excellence website.  Complete four for bronze, five for silver, six for gold.
  • Crew Journey to Excellence Requirement 4.   Service projects:  The crew participates in service projects, with one benefitting your chartering organization.  The projects are entered on the Journey to Excellence website.  Complete two for bronze, three for silver, four for gold.

Enter your service hours here.

CUB SCOUT RANKS:

  • Tiger Cub – Elective 10.  Helping Hands:  Along with your adult partner, help an elderly or shut-in person with a chore.                    Elective 11.  Helping the Needy:  Help collect food, clothing, or toys for needy families with your den or pack.
  • Wolf – Requirement 7d.  With an adult, pick up litter in your neighborhood.  Wear gloves to protect your hands against germs and cuts from sharp objects.            Requirement 11d.  Find out how you can help your church, synagogue, mosque, temple, or religious fellowship. 
  • Bear – Requirement 6b.  Plant a tree in your yard, on the grounds of the group that operates your Cub Scout pack, or in a park or other public place.  Be sure to get permission first.          Requirement 6g.  Take part in a den or pack neighborhood clean-up project.   
  • Webelos – Requirement 8e.  Under the direction of your religious leader, do an act of service for someone else.  Talk about your service with your family and your Webelos den leader.   Tell them how it made you feel.                 Forester Requirement 8.  Plant 20 forest tree seedlings.  Tell how you planter them and what you did to take care of them after planting.                  Naturalist Requirement 12.  Look around your neighborhood and identify how litter might be dangerous to the birds and other animals.  Clean up the litter.  Identify what else you might do to make your neighborhood safer for animals.


    BOY SCOUT RANKS:

  • Second Class – 5.  Participate in an approved (minimum of one hour) service project.
  • First Class – 10.  Tell someone who is eligible to join Boy Scouts, or an inactive Boy Scout, about your troop’s activities.  Invite him to a troop outing, activity, service project, or meeting.  Tell him how to join, or encourage the inactive Boy Scout to become active.  
  • Star – 4.  While a First Class Scout, take part in service projects totaling at least six hours of work.  These projects must be approved by your Scoutmaster.   
  • Life – 4.  While a First Class Scout, take part in service projects totaling at least six hours of work.  These projects must be approved by your Scoutmaster.
  • Eagle – While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community.  (The project should benefit an organization other than Boy Scouting.)  The project plan must approved by the organization benefiting from the effort, your Scoutmaster and troop committee, and the council or district before you start.  You must use the Eagle Scout Leadership Project Workbook, BSA publication No. 512-927, in meeting this requirement.